The Home of a Du

The Home of a Du

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lalondes:

i somehow never realized that monica lewinsky was twenty-two when everything happened and my casual sympathy for her just turned into visceral, crushing terror at the fact that a girl my age was internationally humiliated and driven to suicidal ideation and is still to this day used as a punchline while bill clinton, like, basically gets to continue living his life and enjoying all the perks of being a former president and in all likelihood will be back in the white house in a couple of years

(via maibeitsmayberlline)

Filed under monica lewinsky politics

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This Is Offensive

thedoctorboy:

Ok, so my University put this edition of the newspaper out today.  This editorial was immediately pointed out to me.  At the bottom of the article, taking up 2/3 of the page, was the photo I have uploaded below.  There are so many things wrong with this article I can’t even find words.  Everyone I have shown this article to today has been outraged and concerned by it.  I have encouraged all of them to write to the newspaper.  I would like to put this out there for Tumblr, as well.  This paper is supposed to have editors and has faculty that oversees it, as well.  The fact that this paper is supposed to be representative of a university that is ranked within the top 25 in the US is appalling and embarrassing.  

This Is Offensive

By Gustavo Palomino

"On many occasions at school and at the workplace we are forced to be dishonest or keep quiet when a difficult situation comes up because offending people is seen as a serious crime.  The biggest problem with this is that it makes life boring.  The second biggest problem is that this prevents us from truly understanding each other and solving, sensitive issues since we can’t openly talk about them.  I am not suggesting that you should deliberately offend people, but that the possibility of offending somebody should not prevent you from expressing what you need to express.

The fear of offending others is perhaps most prominent when it comes to talking about race – or rather – not talking about it.  Other than a few openly racist lunatics, we largely don’t talk about this topic although it is clear that it is still an issue.  We never really got to the bottom of why some of us still feel uncomfortable around people who have a significantly different skin color.  I’ve been lucky to have had a really honest relationship with a couple of people, and we talked about this not too long ago.

They, both white and they admitted that they do not hate black people in any way, but they do feel somewhat uncomfortable around them.  They weren’t sure where this feeling came from, and they never tried to find the answer since admitting to that is offensive and people would be outraged.  I am sure there are many others who also share this sentiment to varying degrees.  It would be nice to explore this problem in the classroom, or with people at large, but we can’t since we have to pretend that it isn’t true because it is offensive.

In fear of offending people we also sometimes lie to them when they ask us how they look.  This is most noticeable when the person we are judging is going to an important event and has decided to look her/him best.  In these situations we often lie because we feel that telling them the truth is not worth them being offended.  Unfortunately, we are wrong when we think this.  Now, you may think, “what am I supposed to do?”  “Should I tell her she is fat and ugly?”  In principle, yes.

In practice, you can be nice about it.  Say something like, “the truth is that I do not find you attractive.”  If she asks why, then you can elaborate.  So, you may say something like, “to be honest, you are overweight and unfortunately, I am not attracted to that body type.”  Of course, this will offend her.  The point is that it is worth her being offended.  Now she knows how you feel about her, which lets both of you know where you stand.  Being open about where we stand with each other prevents us from investing into relationships andprojects that will only end in disappointment.  She will get over being offended.

I’ve been offended countless times, and I feel that it is always worth experiencing.  Anything that offends me, or anyone else has some strong reason for doing so.  If someone does or says something that hurts our feelings, it is because we are very sensitive to that something.  It is important to explore that something to find out who we really are, and why we really are that way.  Things we are sensitive to are very meaningful to us and dictate a lot of our actions.  Being openly honest seems to be the only way to figure out who we are, and what our place in the world really is.  It isn’t the end of the world if you get offended.  The sky doesn’t fall, the ground doesn’t open up and eat you and life simply goes on.”

Email: observercopy@gmail.com

Letters to the Editors and Opinions: observeropinions@gmail.com

Facebook.com/rnobserver

Filed under offensive politics rutgers article

497 notes

Cliff Notes on the Three Real Perils Ahead

robertreich:

The “fiscal cliff” is a a metaphor for a government that no longer responds to the biggest challenges we face because it’s paralyzed by intransigent Republicans, obsessed by the federal budget deficit, and overwhelmed by big money from corporations, Wall Street, and billionaires.

If we had a functional government America would address three “cliffs” posing far larger dangers to us than the fiscal one:

The child poverty cliff.

Between 2007 and 2011, the percentage of American school-age children living in poor households grew from 17 to 21%. Last year, according to the Agriculture Department, nearly 1 in 4 young children lived in a family that had difficulty affording sufficient food at some point in the year.

Yet federal programs to help children and lower-income families – food stamps, aid for poor school districts, Pell grants, child health care, child nutrition, pre- and post-natal care, and Medicaid – are being targeted by the Republican right. Over 60 percent of the cuts in the GOP’s most recent budget came out of these programs.

Even if these programs are preserved, they don’t go nearly far enough. But the Obama Administration doesn’t talk about reducing poverty in America. It talks only about preserving the middle class.

Yet unless we focus on better schools, better health, and improved conditions for these poor kids and their families, in a few years America will have a significant population of under-educated and desperate adults.

The baby-boomer healthcare cliff.

Healthcare costs are already 18% of GDP. Between now and 2030, when 76 million boomers join the ranks of the elderly, those costs will soar. This is the principal reason why the federal budget deficit is projected to grow.

The Affordable Care Act offers a start but it isn’t nearly adequate to limit these rising costs. The President and the Democrats have to lead the way in using Medicare and Medicaid’s bargaining power over providers to get lower costs and to move from a fee-for-service system to a fee-for-healthy outcomes system of healthcare.

But we can’t avoid the fact we have the most expensive and least effective system of health care in the world that’s spending 30 percent more on paperwork and administration than on keeping people healthy. The real healthcare cliff can only be avoided if we adopt a single-payer healthcare system.

The environmental cliff.

Global emissions of carbon dioxide jumped 3 percent in 2011 and are expected to jump another 2.6 percent this year according to scientists, putting the human race perilously close to the tipping point when ice caps irretrievably melt, sea-levels rise, and amount of available cropland in the world becomes dangerously small.

Yet Republicans (and their patrons, such as Charles and David Koch) continue to deny climate change. And the Administration is no longer pushing for a cap-and-trade system or a carbon tax.

Yet unless we act to reduce carbon emissions, other major emitters won’t do so. The only binding pact so far is the Kyoto Protocol, which the U.S. never joined. And we’re taking no leadership at the international climate talks now taking place in Qatar.

Yes, America does face a cliff — not a fiscal cliff but a set of precipices we’ll tumble over because the GOP’s obsession over government’s size and spending has obscured them. And Democrats so far haven’t been able or willing to sound the real alarms.

(via wilwheaton)

Filed under politics american politics ahhhhhh

263 notes

KRUGMAN / NY TIMES: The Twinkie Manifesto

"There are, let’s face it, some people in our political life who pine for the days when minorities and women knew their place, gays stayed firmly in the closet and congressmen asked, “Are you now or have you ever been?” The rest of us, however, are very glad those days are gone. We are, morally, a much better nation than we were. Oh, and the food has improved a lot, too.  Along the way, however, we’ve forgotten something important — namely, that economic justice and economic growth aren’t incompatible. America in the 1950s made the rich pay their fair share; it gave workers the power to bargain for decent wages and benefits; yet contrary to right-wing propaganda then and now, it prospered. And we can do that again."

(Source: inothernews, via maibeitsmayberlline)

Filed under politics article NY Times

3,970 notes

the-danimal:

Rachel Maddow explains the 2012 election and its result

“Ohio really did go to President Obama last night. And he really did win. And he really was born in Hawaii. And he really is legitimately President of the United States. Again. And the Bureau of Labor Statistics did not make up a fake unemployment rate last month. And the Congressional Research Service really can find no evidence that cutting taxes on rich people grows the economy. And the polls were not skewed to oversample Democrats. And Nate Silver was not making up fake projections about the election to make conservatives feel bad. Nate Silver was doing math. And climate change is real. And rape really does cause pregnancy sometimes. And evolution is a thing. And Benghazi was an attack on us, it was not a scandal by us. And nobody’s taking away anyone’s guns. And taxes have not gone up. And the deficit is dropping, actually. And Saddam Hussein did not have weapons of mass destruction. And the moon landing was real. And FEMA is not building concentration camps. And UN election observers are not taking over Texas. And moderate reforms of the regulations on the insurance industry and the financial services industry in this country are not the same thing as Communism.” —Rachel Maddow

(via maibeitsmayberlline)

Filed under video rachel maddow politics news YES I LOVE YOU

42,697 notes

superbookwormy:

csi-bakerstreet:

theheartwithin:

almostisntgoodenough:

fucknobarackobama:

ok who the fuck cares though? if we’re “trying” to be equal why should we bring up peoples races or sexuality? George Washington isn’t known as “the first white president” what is the constant need to bring race and sexuality into every little thing? im sure there have been gay senators in the past they just weren’t openly gay. who the hell cares if she’s gay? is she going to do a better or worse job based on her sexuality, race or gender? no probably not! stop giving a shit and then we’ll all be “equal” cause we all already are equal.

^^

100% agreed. I couldn’t say anything on FB about it because some of my gay friends would have been offended but like really if we want to get rid of discrimination between races and genders and sexualities then STOP POINTING THEM OUT. 

I think the reason it should be pointed out is because there are still people that are  scared of ‘coming out’ as being gay/lesbian/bi-sexual, and this isn’t just about equality.The more it’s seen that being having a, what some may consider ’different’ (and I use that term very loosely, so don’t bite my head off) sexuality or race, especially when they are people with power, or that are in the public eye often, the more likely it is that they it will become accepted as an average occurrence. When a celebrity comes out and says they are gay, or support gay marriage, they’re applauded, and cooed at. Why should it be different for politicians?
‘I’m sure there have been gay senators in the past they just weren’t openly gay’  I’m going to come right out and say, this is why it’s a big deal for it to be made clear that they are gay. It shouldn’t be something anyone has to hide. It should be something they can talk about openly and that everyone can know. This woman could inspire more people to be open about their sexuality, just by being open about her own.
End rant. 

It’s a big deal because even as far back as FOUR YEARS AGO she might not have been elected solely because she’s openly gay. It’s a big deal because in the past people of the lgbtq community have had to HIDE in order to be able to be members of mainstream society. We DO NOT have equality and to see us making leaps towards achieving that is WORTH celebrating. We DO NOT have equality and we never will if you disregard it as no big deal and think that it shouldn’t be addressed because it is a big deal. When you’re gay in this country, it is a struggle. Some people lose their entire families. They lost their friends. They can lose their jobs. They aren’t granted the same civil rights as heterosexual Americans and people who aren’t in that position can never fully understand how that feels. They can be denied so much and to have someone elected to office who is openly gay, it says ACCEPTANCE and it’s starting on EQUALITY and it’s a HUGE DEAL. If you have any experience having to hide from the world, from any person in your life, for fear of rejection and/or discrimination, you might understand.
And George Washington wasn’t celebrated for being a white president because it wasn’t a big deal. Being the first president? HUGE deal, but being the first white president? NOT SO MUCH. because of this thing. It’s called white privilege. Back then there wasn’t even a question as to what race the president would be. We’ve come so far since then and we still have far to go. Erasing a persons race and sexuality doesn’t do anything. Accepting someone doesn’t mean denying individuality. It doesn’t mean denying race, sexuality, etc. It means finally understanding that diversity is NOT something to be afraid of and to get rid of the ignorance that surrounds these issues. We’re at tolerance and we need to reach acceptance. We need to stop turning on the television to hear someone say ‘marriage is only supposed to be between a man and a woman’ or that they ‘don’t believe in homosexuals.’ With Tammy in office as an OPENLY GAY WOMAN, for the first time the Senate will have to talk about gay issues WITH someone who is gay instead of talking ABOUT it without anyone there who really knows. It’s a HUGE DEAL. Don’t belittle or erase it. Tammy is the first openly gay woman to take office and it is a fantastic, wonderful, glorious thing. As a gay woman, I am above and beyond happy about this because it is a giant step in our society.

superbookwormy:

csi-bakerstreet:

theheartwithin:

almostisntgoodenough:

fucknobarackobama:

ok who the fuck cares though? if we’re “trying” to be equal why should we bring up peoples races or sexuality? George Washington isn’t known as “the first white president” what is the constant need to bring race and sexuality into every little thing? im sure there have been gay senators in the past they just weren’t openly gay. who the hell cares if she’s gay? is she going to do a better or worse job based on her sexuality, race or gender? no probably not! stop giving a shit and then we’ll all be “equal” cause we all already are equal.

^^

100% agreed. I couldn’t say anything on FB about it because some of my gay friends would have been offended but like really if we want to get rid of discrimination between races and genders and sexualities then STOP POINTING THEM OUT. 

I think the reason it should be pointed out is because there are still people that are  scared of ‘coming out’ as being gay/lesbian/bi-sexual, and this isn’t just about equality.
The more it’s seen that being having a, what some may consider ’different’ (and I use that term very loosely, so don’t bite my head off) sexuality or race, especially when they are people with power, or that are in the public eye often, the more likely it is that they it will become accepted as an average occurrence. 
When a celebrity comes out and says they are gay, or support gay marriage, they’re applauded, and cooed at. Why should it be different for politicians?


‘I’m sure there have been gay senators in the past they just weren’t openly gay’ 
 
I’m going to come right out and say, this is why it’s a big deal for it to be made clear that they are gay. It shouldn’t be something anyone has to hide. It should be something they can talk about openly and that everyone can know. 
This woman could inspire more people to be open about their sexuality, just by being open about her own.

End rant. 

It’s a big deal because even as far back as FOUR YEARS AGO she might not have been elected solely because she’s openly gay. It’s a big deal because in the past people of the lgbtq community have had to HIDE in order to be able to be members of mainstream society. We DO NOT have equality and to see us making leaps towards achieving that is WORTH celebrating. We DO NOT have equality and we never will if you disregard it as no big deal and think that it shouldn’t be addressed because it is a big deal. When you’re gay in this country, it is a struggle. Some people lose their entire families. They lost their friends. They can lose their jobs. They aren’t granted the same civil rights as heterosexual Americans and people who aren’t in that position can never fully understand how that feels. They can be denied so much and to have someone elected to office who is openly gay, it says ACCEPTANCE and it’s starting on EQUALITY and it’s a HUGE DEAL. If you have any experience having to hide from the world, from any person in your life, for fear of rejection and/or discrimination, you might understand.

And George Washington wasn’t celebrated for being a white president because it wasn’t a big deal. Being the first president? HUGE deal, but being the first white president? NOT SO MUCH. because of this thing. It’s called white privilege. Back then there wasn’t even a question as to what race the president would be. We’ve come so far since then and we still have far to go. Erasing a persons race and sexuality doesn’t do anything. Accepting someone doesn’t mean denying individuality. It doesn’t mean denying race, sexuality, etc. It means finally understanding that diversity is NOT something to be afraid of and to get rid of the ignorance that surrounds these issues. We’re at tolerance and we need to reach acceptance. We need to stop turning on the television to hear someone say ‘marriage is only supposed to be between a man and a woman’ or that they ‘don’t believe in homosexuals.’ With Tammy in office as an OPENLY GAY WOMAN, for the first time the Senate will have to talk about gay issues WITH someone who is gay instead of talking ABOUT it without anyone there who really knows. It’s a HUGE DEAL. Don’t belittle or erase it. Tammy is the first openly gay woman to take office and it is a fantastic, wonderful, glorious thing. As a gay woman, I am above and beyond happy about this because it is a giant step in our society.

Filed under politics tammy baldwin it is important